Older Adults Mental Health

Older Adults & Mental Health

Growing older is a natural part of life that can be accompanied by certain life changes that impact mental health. 

Our experts provide support, understanding and treatment to help individuals age 65+ manage their mental health. From psychiatric urgent care to testing, we are here to help.  

Treating Older Adults

Hospital Based Services

Wondering if urgent care or hospitalization services are necessary? Give us a call at 800.678.5500. Our licensed clinicians are experienced in identifying warning signs and assessing an individual’s situation, and they are available 24/7. 

Psychiatric Urgent Care

Our urgent care is open to adults of all ages for walk-in assessments. 

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Inpatient Treatment

Specialty units just for individuals 65+ including a closed unit for patients with dementia.

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Outpatient Services

With one call to 866.852.4001, we can help you determine the outpatient services you or your loved one may need and assist you with understanding your insurance benefit.

Therapy & Psychiatry

Age-appropriate therapies and psychiatric services.

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Telehealth

Most therapy & psychiatry services are also available via telehealth throughout the state of Michigan.

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Testing & Assessment

State-of-the art assessments including testing for older adults and dementia. 

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Families & Friends of Aging Adults

Our support group is designed specifically for those who are caregivers to older adults.

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Elderly Case Management

Provides services for people ages 65+ diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness as well as older adults who are medically fragile and living at home independently, or in settings of support such as living with relatives or in an adult foster care home. Case managers assist with addressing chronic mental health issues as well as the ever changing clinical picture created by medical complications and/or the aging process, coordinate referrals for health and dental services, housing, transportation, financial assistance, employment, social services and other necessary supports. The program also includes a psychiatric physician assistant, a nurse and peer supports.

Call 616.258.7599

Tips & Info from Our Experts

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