Pine Rest Report Predicts Up to 32% Increase in Statewide Suicide Rates Tied to Pandemic

We Need to Talk About Suicide

We Need to Talk About Suicide
We need to start talking about suicide. Now. And we need to keep talking. Suicide has long been a serious public health problem. The recent and sudden isolation, unemployment and precipitous change ushered in by COVID-19 threatens to increase the...

9 Tips for Supporting Someone After a Loved One Dies

9 Tips for Supporting Someone After a Loved One Dies
By Bob VandePol, MSW Supporting someone after a loved one dies provides a daunting challenge. Those you reach out to will never forget your response. Neither will you. The following suggestions have proven helpful: 1. Listening is the most effective...

Talking to Teens About Suicide Prevention

Talking to Teens About Suicide Prevention

Suicide is a difficult topic, but it’s too important to ignore. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people ages 15 to 24. Despite a common belief that only teens and adults die by suicide, younger children…

Preventing Suicide: Risk Factors, Warning Signs, Safety Plans and Hotlines

Preventing Suicide: Risk Factors, Warning Signs, Safety Plans and Hotlines
September is National Suicide Prevention Month, set aside to support and connect with those who’ve been impacted by a death by suicide or have suicidal thoughts as well as to create more awareness about suicide prevention. Thinking about or attempting...

Can suicide risk be detected in the blood?

Can suicide risk be detected in the blood?

Five-year, $3.6 million federal grant to fuel search for biomarker-based methods to evaluate suicide risk. The project is the first longitudinal study of its kind, and is a collaboration between Van Andel Institute’s Lena Brundin, M.D., Ph.D., Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services’ Eric Achtyes, M.D., M.S., and Columbia University Department of Psychiatry’s John Mann, M.D.

Preventing Suicide: Why Talking About “It” Is Essential

Preventing Suicide: Why Talking About “It” Is Essential

Suicide touches all of us. After cancer and heart disease, suicide accounts for more years of life lost than any other cause of death. However, unlike cancer and heart disease, most of us feel very uncomfortable talking to someone about whether they are having thoughts about harming themselves. In this article, Jean Holthaus provides talking tips to start the conversation.

Construction Workers at Higher Risk for Suicide

Construction Workers at Higher Risk for Suicide

Construction workers are statistically at a higher risk for mental health issues than virtually every other profession. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one third of all suicides in 2012 were workers in the construction and…

Tips for Talking to Someone About Self-Harm

Tips for Talking to Someone About Self-Harm
The stigma surrounding self-harm behavior can make it very challenging for those who struggle to seek and find help. Many of the people who self-harm carry great shame regarding their method for managing emotions as a result of the stigma...

Effective Crisis Leadership Following Suicide

Effective Crisis Leadership Following Suicide
By Bob VandePol, MSW When death by suicide strikes the workplace, employees immediately look to its leadership for direction. How leaders respond when all eyes are upon them offers both tremendous opportunity and serious risk for the subsequent outcomes. Do...