Postpartum Depression & Anxiety

A happy time filled with excitement and joy – that’s what most of us envision when someone is having a baby.

For many women, this is not the reality. Nearly 15% – 1 out of every 7 new moms – experience some form of postpartum depression or perinatal mood disorder (PMD). PMD encompasses mood disorders from pregnancy until two years after a baby is born and includes depression, anxiety, psychosis, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Alongside women, more than 1 in 10 men experience postpartum depression.

PMD is the most common complication of childbirth. If it goes untreated, there can be serious complications for moms, babies, and families. Consequences include disruption in mother-baby bonding, interruption in the infant’s development, family and relationship conflicts, and in serious cases, can lead to suicide or infanticide.

PMD impacts the lives of women, babies, and their loved ones. It may impact you or someone you love. PMD is the most common complication of childbirth, yet it can go undiagnosed and untreated. It is imperative that we educate those around us about postpartum depression and perinatal mood disorders while working to reduce the stigma so that women can get early treatment.

Articles & Blogs

Is Postpartum Depression Real?  What these women are experiencing and feeling is real. It is a real disease and like any other medical disease, there are treatments that help. The clincher of this disease, unlike other diseases, is that one of the symptoms of depression and anxiety is guilt. Not just guilt a person feels when they make a mistake, but guilt that feels unquenched by simple reassurances. So, when a woman’s feelings are dismissed by others, they are even more unlikely to have the energy to seek help or believe what they are experiencing is real. 

What is Postpartum Depression?  Nearly 1 out of every 7 new moms experience some form of postpartum depression or perinatal mood disorder (PMD). PMD encompasses mood disorders from pregnancy until two years after a baby is born.

Baby Blues or Something More  The term “baby blues” is often used to refer to the mild mood swings that occur after the birth of a child. Nearly 80% of women express experiencing baby blues. Having the baby blues is NOT a disorder. It is completely normal. Perinatal mood disorders are common (15-20% of women)…but NOT normal.  

Symptoms and Signs of Postpartum Depression  The highest time of risk for new mothers is six months after delivery. Symptoms include excessive worry, sadness, guilt, hopelessness, sleep problems, fatigue, loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities, change in appetite, irritability, and difficulty making decisions. 

What Happens When There is No Joy  PMD is the most common complication of childbirth. If it goes untreated, there can be serious complications for moms, babies, and families. Consequences include disruption in mother-baby bonding, interruption in the infant’s development, family and relationship conflicts. 

Postpartum Depression: Not Just a Woman's Illness  Postpartum Depression doesn’t just affect women. Men can get PPD, too. In fact, recent studies have show that 10% of new dads get postpartum depression, too.

Postpartum Depression: What About the Kids?  Research has shown that left untreated, PMD can have serious ramifications for the children. Problems in babies and children include behavioral issues, problems with emotional and social development, cognitive delays, and a greater risk for lifelong struggles with depression.
 

Pine Rest Services

1-844-MOM-HOPE (1-844-666-4673)
Many pregnant moms and new parents feel sad, worried, anxious, and overwhelmed. Our free and confidential HOPEline can connect you with help and resources. Calls are returned within 1 business day.
1-844-MOM-HOPE | Pregnancy & Postpartum HOPEline

Support Groups

Counseling Services 
Call 866-852-4001 to schedule a counselor specializing in postpartum depression, anxiety and other perinatal mood disorders in your area.

Mother and Baby Program (Hospital Day Program)
Only one of three like it in the United States, the program provides daily treatment for postpartum depression, anxiety and other perinatal mood disorders in an environment which enhances mother-baby bonding. Our program includes a nursery, allowing mothers to bring their babies with them to treatment, eliminating barriers to women seeking treatment such as separation from the baby, child care and feeding issues.

Hospitalization 
Our inpatient units are designed for persons who experience significant behavioral health issues and proivde a safe environment in which persons can begin to heal. Call 616-455-9200 or 800-678-5500 for assistance.

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1-844-MOM-HOPE (1-844-666-4673)

Many pregnant moms and new parents feel sad, worried, anxious, and overwhelmed. Our free and confidential HOPEline can connect you with help and resources. Calls are returned within 1 business day. 
Pregnancy & Postpartum HOPEline | 1-844-MOM-HOPE